Skip to main content

Service and leadership that maximize the success of all students

Menu

 JCCS Schools Offer Students a Variety of Summer Opportunities

​​From writing plays to programming computers, Juvenile Court and Community Schools (JCCS) students have a variety of options for enrichment or to catch up academically this summer.

Several of the community schools are offering classes over the summer break, including San Pasqual Academy, Innovations Academy of Empowerment, and various community schools. All of the court schools also have classes over summer.

"In JCCS, we make sure students have both voice and choice in their learning,” said Stacy Spector, executive director. “This is especially important during Intersession, when we know we are competing for students' interest with the beach, their friends, or other demands on their attention.”

At the court schools, which educate students in juvenile detention facilities, students are learning this summer about science with a horticulture program at the Sierra Vista School in Kearny Mesa and about art at East Mesa School near Otay Mesa. Some students in the court schools are also taking online community college courses over the summer.

Students at some community schools are writing their own one-act plays as part of the Playwrights Project, a nonprofit group working to advance literacy, creativity, and communication by empowering individuals to voice their stories through playwriting programs and theatre productions.

At La Mesa Community School, students are getting 90-minute sessions twice a week with artists from the Playwrights Project. When they’re done with their plays at the end of the month, professional actors will act out scenes from them in class.

“The kids love it,” Teacher Aimee Trevino said. “They’re engaged and their excited to see their work produced.”

Students are also writing plays over the summer at North County Technology and Science Academy, Bayside Community School, and Thurgood Marshall School. Artists with the Playwrights Project will work with students in about 20 JCCS classes during the upcoming school year. 

Students at various JCCS locations will have the opportunity to learn about computer programming during a two-week IT Camp organized by the Integrated Technology Services Division. The camp focuses on how computers use language. Students get a chance to build and program small computers.

The technology programs are happening at North County Technology and Science Academy, South Bay Technology Academy, Innovations Academy of Empowerment, Metro Technology Academy, and McPhatter Community School.

At San Pasqual Academy, a program for foster youth, students can catch up with English, math, history, or science class and take electives in computer literacy, culinary arts, sports, or leadership.

“All students have an opportunity to learn,” Principal Yvette Davis said. “Teachers have really worked hard to building engaging lessons and hands-on learning.”

Not only do students get the opportunity to recover credits, but they also get a chance to build their confidence in school, which could lead to greater success when school starts back up next month, Davis said.

The structured intersession at San Pasqual Academy goes a full five hours each day for a couple of four-week sessions. In order to get the most participation possible, all students are automatically enrolled in recommended classes and have to request to withdraw with approval from their parents.  About 75 percent of the 80 students there are attending at least one class over the summer.

At the court schools, which educate students in juvenile detention facilities, students are learning this summer about science with a horticulture program at the Sierra Vista School in Kearny Mesa and about art at East Mesa School near Otay Mesa. Some students in the court schools are also taking online community college courses over the summer.

“We want students to know success and Intersession is one way to make this happen,” Spector said.

Juvenile Court and Community Schools are operated by the San Diego County Office of Education and provide a fully accredited educational program for school-age youth who are either wards of the court or have been referred by social services, probation, or their school district.