Skip to main content

Service and leadership that maximize the success of all students

Menu

 County Students Continue to Make Gains on California Standards Tests

​​In testament to the hard work of students, teachers, administrators, and parents, the number of San Diego County students demonstrating proficiency in math and English language arts on the California Standards Tests (CSTs) continues to increase. This year:

  • 63 percent of students in grades 2-11 scored at proficient or advanced in English language arts, an increase of three percent from 2011 and 12 percent since 2008 
  • 55 percent of students in grades 2-11 scored at proficient or advanced in math, an increase of one percent from last year and eight percent over five years. 

Students in each of the four major ethnic groups—white, African American, Hispanic and Asian—showed improvement from 2011 to 2012. The trends are also positive for English learners and economically disadvantaged students.

Compared to 2011, four percent more African American and Hispanic students are now demonstrating proficiency in English language arts. These increases contribute to a 14 percent gain for African American students and a 15 percent gain for Hispanic students over the last five years.

For English learners, the percentage of students scoring proficient and advanced in English language arts increased two percent over last year, from 27 percent in 2011 to 29 percent in 2012. Compared to five years ago, 11 percent more English learners are now scoring at proficient or advanced.

For economically disadvantaged students, the percentage of students scoring at the top two performance levels in English language arts increased three percent from 2011 to 2012, from 45 to 48 percent. Fourteen percent more economically disadvantaged students are scoring proficient or advanced than five years ago.

Despite the gains, achievement gaps persist between African American and Hispanic students with their White and Asian counterparts, between English learners and their fluent peers, and between socioeconomically disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students.

We must accelerate our efforts to close these achievement gaps, which are among the most persistent challenges facing schools. We’re seeing progress, but it’s not happening fast enough for the students who are now in our schools.